e-Health Sensor Platform for Arduino and Raspberry Pi

Fantastic new product from Cooking Hacks. Quite pricey at 290 euros, but so many practical applications!

The e-Health Sensor Shield allows Arduino and Raspberry Pi users to perform biometric and medical applications where body monitoring is needed by using 9 different sensors: pulse, oxygen in blood (SPO2), airflow (breathing), body temperature, electrocardiogram (ECG), glucometer, galvanic skin response (GSR – sweating), blood pressure (sphygmomanometer) and patient position (accelerometer).

e-Health Sensor Platform for Arduino and Raspberry Pi [Biometric / Medical Applications].

Combined RSS feed aggregator

My apologies for the delay. I have re-created the Raspberry Pi combined RSS aggregate feed. Please remove your previous subscriptions and re-subscribe to this feed. http://www.google.com/reader/public/atom/user%2F10025320280437270102%2Flabel%2FRaspberryPi. A comment on this post from those using it would be greatly appreciated. Just in case I mess it up again, it would be nice to know it’s worth re-creating. Many thanks!

 

Raspberry Pi / Android app to remote control a car (reblog plus re-format)

“doctoboggan” has created a project with a Raspberry Pi and Android App working in tandem to drive a remote control car.

Original article here: Show HN: I built a Raspberry Pi/Android driven toy car | Hacker News but reblogging to include the images in-line to make it easier to read!

And I quote…

This is the current iteration of the car.

Show HN: I built a Raspberry Pi/Android driven toy car | Hacker News

Details:
I wrote a simple android app that streams the accelerometer data from the phone to the pi over a simple socket. The pi then uses this data to drive the DC motor and the servo motor. Tilting the phone to control the car feels very natural. In this pic you can see the wifi dongle I’ve used.

Show HN: I built a Raspberry Pi/Android driven toy car | Hacker News

I am using Adafruit Occidental v0.2 as my OS because it has support for my wifi dongle. It also makes some hardware interaction easier and comes pre-installed with some good python libraries.

Here is a picture of the breadboard.

Show HN: I built a Raspberry Pi/Android driven toy car | Hacker News

I am using the L293DNE hbridge chip for DC motor control. The two black wires you see coming off the board connect to the motor.

In this pic is the battery pack I am using to power the pi.

Show HN: I built a Raspberry Pi/Android driven toy car | Hacker News

I purchased it from Amazon.

Here is a pic of the battery pack I am using for the DC motor.

Show HN: I built a Raspberry Pi/Android driven toy car | Hacker News

Here is a closeup of the steering servo.

Show HN: I built a Raspberry Pi/Android driven toy car | Hacker News

It is an HS-55 and I power it directly from the Pi’s 5v rail.

To control it, I use the Servoblaster kernel module.

My next plans are to add some sensors and make it autonomous. Let me know what you think.

I’m going to try to start my own robotics project with the blog posts I’ve accumulated over the past few weeks. Wish me luck!