Picorder, version 2 – #RaspberryPi has sensor-y overload

Pardon the pun in the title, couldn’t resist.

Here is a two-part video I’ve just shot of the Picorder version 2. I’m just about to work on version 3, so it seemed the perfect time to document my work so far.

Part 1:

Part 2

Here’s a list of the sensors and bits and pieces that make up the Picorder:

  • A Raspberry Pi (I know, I know, a stunning revelation) in a ModMyPi case.
  • A 7200mAh USB charger battery pack.
  • A Nwazet Key Lime Pi (which is essentially a Pi Cobbler with an onboard analog-to-digital converter giving 8 analog input/output pins) (also available from Pimoroni)
  • A 16×2 character LCD display.
  • A tactile switch / momentary push button.
  • Two accelerometers.
  • An Adafruit Ultimate GPS breakout board.
  • A PCF 8591 board with onboard A2D, temperature sensor, light dependent resistor and potentiometer.
  • A Piezo vibration sensor. (analogue, connected to the Key Lime Pi)
  • A sound detecting microphone. (analogue, connected to the Key Lime Pi)
  • A tiny temperature sensor (the type of which momentarily escapes me) (analogue, connected to the Key Lime Pi)
  • A 61802H2 humidity sensor (analogue, connected to the Key Lime Pi)

 

 

8 comments for “Picorder, version 2 – #RaspberryPi has sensor-y overload

  1. 2 July 2013 at 21:34

    Looking great!

  2. Tim
    2 July 2013 at 21:35

    Looking Good

  3. 2 July 2013 at 21:48

    Wot no camera? :) Lovely work!

    • 3 July 2013 at 06:03

      Ahhhh. Other plans for the camera ;-)

  4. Tony
    22 July 2013 at 15:32

    Hi recantha nice one!
    Possible source of problems may be power line interference. Try putting a few caps around on the power lines, some tantalum and some smaller, faster ones. You might want also to check total power drain.
    Hope it helps and please can you fit a Romulan cloaked ship detector in version 3
    8-) Cheers Tony

  5. Frank Johnson
    23 July 2013 at 16:53

    If you douse it in water, and hit it around with a tennis racket, it would be much more effective at screwing you your electronics than the way you man-handle all the components without any ESD protection. I’m surprised any of it works.

    • 23 July 2013 at 18:26

      What a… charming comment. Truly.

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